Off On A Tangent

A while back I was searching an unknown pattern on some UK sites.  The flatware had the familiar British registration “kite” mark and that’s what brought me to search the UK sites.  I did discover my pattern name was “Japanese” and I wrote about it in my “Brown and Brothers” post.  But while I was searching through those British sites, I saw some familiar aesthetic patterns. Patterns that were known to be American.  What were they doing with English backstamps? I made notes and saved illustrations to be revisited another day.  And today is that day.

Let’s start with the “Brunswick” pattern because it was one of the early patterns manufactured by American companies, perhaps with its roots in England. The first cut below is from an 1855 catalogue from Joseph H. Adams of New York printed in Spanish. The Sargent & Co. 1874 illustration shows Luther Boardman’s variation. John Round, an English manufacturer, was offering “Brunswick” and “New Brunswick” (next illustration in this post) about the turn of the century. And at the bottom the of the grouping below, the “Brunswick” name was still being used as late as 1910 for an iron spoon.

Brunswick pattern

Brunswick patterns

Below is another version of the “Brunswick” pattern and an illustration of the “Jewel” pattern from a “John Round & Son” catalogue. I’m not aware of an American patent for ‘Jewel”, however the “Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co” mark can be found on  this design. This company did business in Canada and in the 1860s claimed to make products of “Heavy Plated Argentine”. “Argentine” is a name for nickel silver found in flatware catalogues from Great Britain. There is a “Patent Argentine Plate” catalogue from 1873 and John Round used the same wording in their advertisements from 1870’s.

John Round Catalogue

John Round Catalogue

The “Laurel” pattern was patented by Henry W. Hirschfeld in 1878 for Meriden Britannia. It seems to be the most common American pattern found in English catalogues like “Silber & Fleming” or “Buck & Moseley”. Toronto based company “Rice Lewis & Son” offers “Laurel” on their page of “Nevada Silver Spoons and Forks”.  In the next group of illustrations the “Hobbs Hardware” page notes that the spoons are made of an “Argentine Silver Base”. Hobbs was located in London, Canada with a branch office in Birmingham, England. The “Hardware” illustration is from an 1892 ad for the “Toronto Silver Plate Co.”. The “Laurel” pattern can be found with British  hallmarks like “Nevada D&A” (Daniel & Arter), “Roumanian Silver” and “Eureka Silver”. “”products are seen sold by “Wm Duff & Co.” in an 1886 publication.

Laurel pattern

Laurel pattern

The “Eastlake” pattern has an American patent for 1879 though not assigned to any company; the designers George Gill and Edwin Brittin were part of the Bridgeport Silver Co.  George Gill was from England. This pattern is also known as “Lyonnaise”. In my search, I came across a spoon marked “BB” with symbols, possibly for “Barker Brothers”. Canadian catalogues offering this pattern include: “Risley & Kerrigan” and “Hobbs Hardware”. 

Risley & Kerrigan catalogue 1886

Risley & Kerrigan catalogue 1886

Note below “Eastlake” also made of “Argentine Silver”.  The illustration to the right is from an 1892 ad for Toronto Silver Plate Co.

Eastlake pattern

Eastlake pattern

The “Newport” pattern was patented in 1879 by Henry Hirschfeld and assigned to Rogers & Bro. You can find the “Newport” pattern in England marked “Brazilian Silver D&A” (Daniel & Arter). Was there some connection between “Meriden Britannia” and “Daniel & Arter”? “Daniel & Arter” were issued a Canadian trade mark on November 22 1893. Looks like more research – ohhh !!!

Newport pattern

Newport pattern

On the “Wellington” pattern “Daniel & Arter” marks can also be found. “ELECTRIC NEVADA” is an interesting example. This pattern was patented in the United States in 1886 by Charles Casper, but not assigned to any company. I believe he started the “Meriden Silver Plate Co.”, one of a few companies to mark this pattern. Crown Silver possibly of Toronto was another. Meriden Silver also had facilities in Toronto in the 1880s.

Wellington pattern

Wellington pattern

“Albany” has been a popular pattern in England and I believe is being produced today. It was also made by American companies including “International Silver” and “Wallace”. Below it is offered in solid silver in the 1899 “Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Co. catalogue.

Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Co catalogue

Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Co catalogue

Now we are back to where we started with a page from a “John Round & Son” catalogue, featuring “Albany” & “Brunswick”. The “Albany”  pattern is also in the 1898 “Rice Lewis & Son” catalogue without a pattern name, just a number and made by “Thomas Turner & Co.”

 

John Round catalogue

John Round catalogue

Even though I have had English flatware in my Etsy shop this is all new to me. I’m looking for all the help I can get. I would like to do more posts on silver plate patterns from England, however have been unable to find very many books or catalogs on the subject.

 

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This entry was posted in Brunswick pattern, Canadian silverplate, Eastlake pattern, England British cutlery, Laurel pattern, UK cutlery, UK flatware and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Off On A Tangent

  1. Ginene Nagel says:

    Fabulous patterns, I love the aesthetic patterns the most, I have never seen one in person. Of course, I come across the china patterns often, but not flatware. I think you are the person who might need to write and compile the book on the subject you are looking for information on. There is a hole in the information available…isn’t that the number one reason to write reference books…to fill a need? Who could do that better than you!
    Ginene

    • queenofsienna says:

      I always thought that the beautiful English transfer aesthetic pattern china should have complimentary aesthetic pattern flatware but up until recently, I didn’t see much evidence of it. It is interesting to me that these American aesthetic patterns were being manufactured in England. Talk about filling a need! I need to learn so much more…

  2. KerryCan says:

    Those Eastlake patterns are really ornate, aren’t they?! The range of designs is fascinating and so broad! When I think of the variations made to such simple and practical utensils, it convinces me, yet again, of the extent to which we humans want to exert our tastes and individuality through our things!

  3. Melissa says:

    Impressive research! I am inspired! I happen to love the patterns designed by Henry W. Hirschfeld (and similar ones of the same era) so keep an eye out for them when I am out and about. Even with the handful I have, I’ve noticed the different makers marks and it has made me curious about the connections between the companies who produced them. Now you’ve opened a new door with the English connection. All fabulous patterns that you included in your post. One question: Where did you find so many catalogs of the time? They are wonderful.

    • queenofsienna says:

      Thanks very much for your comment and great question. I love researching these old patterns and the companies who manufactured them. A good place to find the old catalogs is archive.org …for example, just do a Google search “archive.org “silver plated” spoon”. Click on one of the items that look interesting. Once that catalog comes up they will show you many similar catalogs as well. If you have any questions, just email me at queenofsienna@gmail.com.

  4. Mike says:

    Isn’t the jewel pattern referred to as the Persian design in America?

    • queenofsienna says:

      Mike, after taking a closer look at the illustration in the John Round catalog, I agree with your observation. It does look more like the illustration of the Persian pattern in the 1877 Rogers & Bro. catalog (except for the fine lines in the center). Very observant!

  5. queenofsienna says:

    Mike, the two patterns are very similar but I believe there are very small differences. I wrote a post on this subject a few years ago… You can find it here

    https://queenofsienna.wordpress.com/2013/07/09/persian-versus-jewell/

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