Collecting By Design: Austin F. Jackson

I know, I’ve said it before and I’m saying it again.  There are many different kinds of silver collectors out there.  Some collect anything with a squirrel on it, some are looking for salt spoons, others search for obscure backstamps, and some collect by a certain designer.  And if they collect Austin F. Jackson designs, they have a lot to choose from. In the mid and latter part of the 1800’s, Reed & Barton was looking to hire talented individuals to build up their company.  And not only were they searching within the United States, they were also looking abroad.  They hired an English designer, Austin Frederick Jackson, whose designs are the subject of this post. I’m not certain exactly when they hired Mr. Jackson, but the first U.S. patent I can find for him is in 1883, the pattern was named “Parisian” by Reed & Barton.

1883 13860 Parisian

“Parisian” Patent Specification

In his patent specifications for “Parisian”, Austin Frederick Jackson states that he is “a subject of the Queen of Great Britain”.

1883-1886 Patents 1880s

Some Patents 1883-1886

Another Austin Jackson design patented in 1883 and assigned to Reed & Barton was called “Russian”.  This might be my favorite of all of Mr. Jackson’s designs.  The hammered finish and squarish top with flowers and insect (“a common housefly” as described in the patent specification) is so unusual and lovely.

20160427_073009-1.jpg

Dust Jacket of Noel Turner’s “American Silver Flatware 1837-1910”

I’m not alone in my admiration of the “Russian” pattern.  Noel Turner selected that design for the dust jacket  of his book “American Silver Flatware 1837-1910”.  An image of the well worn dust jacket of my copy of that book is shown above.

1890 20429

1890 Patent for Back of Brushes, Mirrors

Austin Jackson designed hollowware in addition to flatware. An example of his design for the back of brushes and mirrors is shown above.

1891-92 Harlequin 1891-92

1891-92 “Harlequin” Series

His “Harlequin” series of floral designs for coffee and teaspoons was so successful that Reed & Barton has reissued it over the years.

1893 Jewelers Circular Feb pg21

“Harlequin” Ad from February 1893 Jewelers Circular

Austin Jackson was a man of varied talents and interests.  Not all of his patents involved decorative designs for flatware and hollowware.1891 Patent No. 463991 It says at the top of the patent shown above “Device for Ornamenting Metals”. What more can I say? And the following design looks even more involved!

1891 454592

1891 Patent No. 454592

1891 was the “Year of the Souvenir”; there was a craze going on my friends.  And Reed & Barton / Austin Jackson jumped right on the bandwagon with the following designs.

1891 Souvenir Spoons

1891 Patents for Souvenir Spoons

A. F. Jackson designed some lovely tea / coffee pots; following is one of them:

1892 21291

1892 “Patent No. 21291

And another follows:

1892 21297

1892 Patent No. 21297

A. F. Jackson was ahead of his time; he was on the cutting edge of trends.  In 1894 there was an orange craze going on.  There were quite a few different crazes associated with eating utensils happening in the latter part of the 19th Century.  The orange craze was a BIG one.  Austin Jackson must have known it was coming (or maybe the following patent made it happen) as he designed an orange spoon two years earlier than the orange frenzy started. You can read all about the orange craze in my post in this blog “The Eating of the Orange”.

1892 Orange Spoon

1892 Orange Spoon Patent

Austin Jackson was born in Birmingham, England in 1850 and died in 1906 in Taunton, Massachusetts.  One of his later patents is the following:

1902 36153

1902 Patent No. 36153

I’m sure you will agree, Austin F. Jackson was a very talented man indeed. I’ve written other posts on Austin Jackson’s “Italian” and “Renaissance” patterns.  Search “Austin Jackson” in the upper right hand corner of this blog and you will find them.      

Posted in Austin F. Jackson, Reed & Barton, Renaissance Pattern, Russian Pattern, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Brown and Brothers

A while back I came across a spoon that had the most intricate aesthetic design that I had ever seen.  It was a small spoon, what was called a coffee spoon back in the late 1800s, a demitasse spoon now.  It had images of ferns, bamboo, butterflies and fans, both front and back of the handle.  Everything a good Aesthetic Period piece of art should have. Because it was such a small spoon and the design was so intricate, you really had to look at it with a magnifying glass or, better yet, a loop. As I looked at the magnified image of the back of the handle, to my surprise I found a British registration mark, called a “kite” mark by some.

I was familiar with these marks.  They were often found on the backs of  transferware and the “kite” shape British registration mark was used between 1842 and 1883.  This was the first time I had seen this mark on a piece of flatware.  The following photo shows the mark on my spoon next to a mark on a piece of transferware:

British Registration Marks on Pottery and Flatware

British Registration Marks on Pottery and Flatware

There was no maker’s mark on my spoon, just the registration mark.  Even under magnification, it was not easy to read.  I have not as yet identified the manufacturer with any certainty.  If anyone has information about this pattern, I’d be happy to hear from you.  Following are additional photos of the handle design, both front and back:

Top Front of Handle

Top Front of Handle

A round Japonesque style fan dominates the top front of the handle with a bird below it and flora all around.

Bottom Front

Bottom Front

The front design stretches all the way down the handle to the bowl.

Back Top

Back Top

The back of the handle is no less beautiful than the front.  There is a fan at the top with a butterfly below it to the left, as well as flowers and bamboo stalks.

Entire Back

Entire Back

Ferns and flowers reach all the way to the back of the bowl.

UPDATE: I believe the kite mark showed the date May 31, 1880.  I also believe that the patent could possibly be assigned to William Gallimore and Co.

1880 British Patents Journal

1880 Commissioner of British Patents’ Journal

This pattern has been found in a Joseph Rodgers and Sons catalog circa 1900; they called the pattern “Japanese”.  Apparently this pattern was made by various manufacturers:

1900-catalog-rodgers-josephrodgers-sons-sheffield-pg160

Circa 1900 Joseph Rodgers & Sons, Sheffield, England Catalog pg160

I have found a couple other pieces to add to my collection:

My Collection

My Collection

I’m sure you are wondering what any of this has to do with the subject of this post, Brown and Brothers.  Well, one day I saw the image of a Brown & Bros. spoon on the internet and it had a British registration mark on the back of the handle!  I had assumed that my little spoon was manufactured in England.  Now I discovered that an American manufacturer had obtained a British registration mark and stamped it on his flatware.  As my search continued for more Brown & Bros. flatware, I learned that apparently it was the same registration mark being used on multiple designs.  I was stumped.  Why would that be?  And then I found the answer.  The British registration was not for the individual pattern, it was for the shape of the handle as it came up from the bowl…a roundish shape that then flattened out as it went further up the handle.

British Design Registration June 8 1876

British Design Registration June 8 1876

The British registration had been obtained for the design patented by Le Roy S. White in 1876 as follows:

1876 Patent 9311 Le Roy S. White

1876 Patent 9311 Le Roy S. White

Following is the specification for Patent 9311, showing it was assigned to Brown & Brothers of Waterbury, Connecticut:

Patent 9311 Specification

Patent 9311 Specification

I was so impressed with the fact that Brown & Bros. had obtained a British registration mark for the shape of their handles, that I wanted to learn more about them. 

Factory Certificate Trade Mark

Factory Certificate Trade Mark

Following is a very well written and informative article from an 1896 publication, The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Vol. 2:

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg343

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg343

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg344

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg344

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg344a

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg344a

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg344b

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg344b

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg345

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg345

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg346

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg346

And the last page:

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg347

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg347

This post would not be complete without discussing Le Roy S. White, the designer of the handle registered in England.  Le Roy (sometimes spelled Leroy) was not only an extremely talented designer but also a designer of various articles with both mechanical  and electrical applications.  He has been discussed several times elsewhere in other posts in this blog.  The following comes from the same 1896 publication as referenced above.

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg385

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg385

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg385a

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg385a

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg386

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg386

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg387

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Volume 2 pg387

Following are a couple of Mr. White’s flatware design patents:

1875 8571 Brown&Bros L.White 1875

1875 Patent 8571 Brown&Bros L.White

Specification for Patent 8571 (which looks remarkably similar to the “Olive” pattern):

1875 8571a Brown&Bros L.White 1875

1875 Patent 8571a Brown&Bros L.White

And this 1876 patent:

1876 009344 Brown&Bro LeRoy White

1876 Patent 009344 Brown & Bro. LeRoy White

And the specification:

1876 009344a Brown&Bro LeRoy White 1876

1876 Patent 009344a Brown&Bro LeRoy White

Following are images of various flatware patterns manufactured by Brown and Brothers:

Some Patterns

Some Patterns

Following is a bar spoon manufactured by Brown & Bros.:

Brown & Bros. Bar Spoon

Brown & Bros. Bar Spoon

This spoon doesn’t have the British registration mark:

Back of Bar Spoon

Back of Bar Spoon

But the shape of the handle is the same as patented by Le Roy White for which the British registration mark was obtained.  This bar spoon is available at my Etsy shop:  https://www.etsy.com/shop/queenofsienna

 
Posted in British kite mark, British registration mark, Brown & Bros., Brown and Brothers, Le Roy White, LeRoy White | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Got Hiawatha?

There was a fascination with the devil in the second half of the 19th century.  I’ve already written a post called “The Devil You Say” regarding that obsession.  Devil images appeared in silverplated flatware and hollowware made by major manufacturers such as Reed & Barton and Meriden Britannia, especially in the 1880s.  There was one devil image, however, I haven’t discussed. It’s the one shown in the following patent.

Holmes & Edwards

Patent 17,777 Holmes & Edwards. Klingel & Wilks 1887

This 1887 patent, designed by Robert Klingel and Walter Wilks, was assigned to Holmes & Edwards.  I have seen flatware made in the floral pattern shown in the patent; the name of the design is “Hiawatha”.  But I have never seen a piece of flatware with the devil face shown within the patent application. 

Specifications for Patent 17,777

Specification for Patent 17,777

What were Mssrs. Klingel and Wilks thinking when they included that devil face along with the floral design in their patent? Did they intend for the devil face to be used on a certain piece of flatware, for example a nutpick?  We’ll never know.  All their patent specification dwells on is the contour of the handle, the swells curves and beads.  Not one word is said about the devil!

Have you seen this face?

Have you seen this face?

If any of you dear readers have ever seen this devil face version of Holmes & Edwards “Hiawatha”, I’d love to hear from you!

Posted in devil face, Hiawatha, holmes & edwards, Robert Klingel, Walter Wilks | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

The Mystery of the Maltese Cross

A reader of this blog recently contacted me and asked if I could assist her with the identification of a Bridgeport Silver Co. mark on a piece of hollowware that she had.  This is a photo of her “nut bowl” as she called it:

Nut Bowl Item # 609

Nut Bowl Item # 609

And this is a photo of the mark on the bottom:

609 Mark

609 Mark

This is a closer view of another Bridgeport Silver Co. mark:

Bridgeport Silver Co. Mark

Bridgeport Silver Co. Mark

In addition to “Bridgeport Silver Co.” the mark includes a beehive image in the center and a Maltese Cross at the base. She mentioned that in a prior post I had included a page from the 1881-82 Boyd’s Directory of Fairfield County which listed The Bridgeport Silver Co. under the Silver Platers and Plated Wares section.  It showed James Staples as President and Samuel Larkins as Secretary and Treasurer.  It also showed their address as “Norman c RR av, Bridgeport”.  See the following:

Boyds Fairfield Co 1881-82

Boyds Fairfield Co 1881-82

Directly above the Bridgeport Silver Co. entry in this directory was Rogers & Brittin, Lake n RR, W Stratford, Bridgeport.

So from the information that I had, I surmised that Bridgeport Silver Co. was making hollowware in 1881.  The Maltese Cross at the bottom of the mark reminded me of a Rogers & Brittin post card:

Rogers & Brittin Postcard

Rogers & Brittin Postcard

The Maltese Cross image along with “UNXLD Best” in the center of the cross was featured on the card.  That Maltese Cross / UNXLD logo was trademarked by Rogers & Brittin on May 4, 1880 (see above).  Was Rogers & Brittin connected with The Bridgeport Silver Co.?  For those of you wondering what “UNXLD” stood for, I think it was “Unexcelled”.

The squirrel at the top of the nut bowl reminded me of Edwin L. Brittin, formerly of the Derby Silver Co. and now treasurer of Rogers & Brittin.  Edwin had patented a lovely design for flatware incorporating the squirrel image in 1875:

Patent 8846 12-14-1875

Patent 8846 12-14-1875

The specifications of the patent show that Edwin L. Brittin was in Derby, Connecticut when the patent was received and we know that Derby Silver Co. produced flatware with this pattern.

Patent 8846 12-14-1875 Squirrel

Patent 8846 12-14-1875 Squirrel

This is a photo of the design(s) on an actual nut pick.  The pick on the right closely resembles the illustration in the patent.  The pick on the left has some variations, such as the larger flower to the right of and below the squirrel:

1875 Brittin Squirrel comparison

1875 Brittin Squirrel comparison

 

I have seen these squirrel nut picks stamped with “PAT APL FOR”, “Pat. Dec. 14, 1875” and “Pat. Jan. 18, 1876” (the latter being the date of another Edwin Brittin patent).

Bridgeport Silver Co. made this knife rest:

 
Bridgeport Silver Co. Knife Rest

Bridgeport Silver Co. Knife Rest

Doesn’t the squirrel on the knife rest look remarkably similar to the squirrel on the top of the nut bowl as well as the squirrel in Edwin Brittin’s patent design?

In 1879 Edwin Brittin partnered with George Gill to produce the “Lyonnaise”, also known as “Eastlake”, pattern:

1879 Patent 11268 Gill&Brittin 1879 Lyonnaise

1879 Patent 11268 Gill&Brittin 1879 Lyonnaise

The patent specification below shows both Gill and Brittin in Derby, CT but does not assign this patent to anyone:

1879  Patent 11268 Gill&Brittin 1879 Lyonnaise

1879 Patent 11268 Gill&Brittin 1879 Lyonnaise

Derby Silver, however, doesn’t seem to have made this pattern although others did, including Rogers & Brittin and some marked Bridgeport Silver Co.  Following is a photo of a ladle in the Lyonnaise pattern as well as a demitasse spoon in the Leader pattern; both have  “Bridgeport Silver Co.” marks:

Two Pieces with Bridgeport Silver Co. Backstamps

Two Pieces with Bridgeport Silver Co. Backstamps

However, both the ladle and the spoon were apparently manufactured by Holmes & Edwards.

Bridgeport Silver Co. Marks

Bridgeport Silver Co. Marks

The ladle has “XIV” after “Bridgeport Silver Co.” and the demitasse spoon as “A1” after “Bridgeport Sil. Co.”  “XIV” and “B.S. Co. A1” were both used by Holmes & Edwards after acquiring Rogers & Brittin in 1882 and upon Edwin Brittin’s untimely death at the age of 33.  Later, Holmes & Edwards also trademarked a Maltese Cross symbol in 1888.

1893 Digest of Trade Marks 1893 pg34

1893 Digest of Trade Marks 1893 pg34

I believe that Bridgeport Silver Co. was associated with Rogers & Brittin. And that prior to Holmes & Edwards acquisition of Rogers & Brittin the Bridgeport Silver Co. mark, the one shown on our subject “nut bowl”, appeared only on hollowware.  An assumption could easily be made that “Bridgeport Silver Co.” was a mark of “Rogers & Brittin”, who produced flatware with the “Rogers & Brittin” mark.  The hollowware with that Bridgeport Silver Co. beehive and Maltese Cross could have been actually produced by some other company, a company like Derby Silver for Rogers & Brittin.

Holmes & Edwards produced very few hollowware items.  And from what I have seen, those items were manufactured after the formation of International Silver in 1898.  I feel confident in my belief that our nut bowl with the Bridgeport Silver Co. mark was not produced by Holmes & Edwards but by and under the control of Rogers & Brittin.  When Holmes & Edwards acquired Rogers & Brittin, they also acquired that Bridgeport Silver Co. mark.

I mention Derby Silver Co. as possibly manufacturing the hollowware with the Bridgeport Silver Co. mark because there seems to be a connection.  If you remember in the Boyd’s Directory, Derby Silver is listed along with Rogers & Brittin and Bridgeport Silver.  Now if we look at Edwin Brittin’s squirrel patent, he was living in Derby.  And if we look at the Eastlake or Lyonnaise patent we notice that both George Gill and Edwin Brittin are also residing in Derby. 

The style and design motifs represented on the Bridgeport Silver Co. pieces I’ve seen are very similar to those designed by George Gill and produced by Reed & Barton (George Gill was a designer for Reed & Barton circa 1870 – 1873).  Below are two examples of details from Bridgeport Silver Co. pieces:

Gill Like Pattern Nos. 214 & 904

Gill Like Bridgeport Silver Co. Pattern Nos. 214 & 904

The images below reflect elements of George Gill’s designs for Reed & Barton. 

Gill 1871 4696 & 4813

Gill 1871 4696 & 4813

I haven’t found any patents supporting this belief (yet) but I am making the assumption that George Gill was the designer behind Bridgeport Silver Co.; that is, except for our squirrel nut bowl which might have been another Brittin & Gill collaboration.

George Gill, although fairly prolific with his design patents, is rather an elusive character.  I’ve pieced together the following information from census records:

George Gill Census Listings

George Gill Census Listings

From what I can gather, George was born around 1842 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, UK and was employed as a die sinker and designer.  In 1870 there is a George Gill in Taunton, Massachusetts and this is the time when George was working for Reed & Barton.  The 1880 census lists him in Stratford, CT.  The 1891 census shows him back in the UK.  The last patent I see for him is the 1882 “Boston” pattern. 

As far as the officers of the Bridgeport Silver Co. go, the President was James Staples (1824-1903) who started out in lumber, and failed.  Then he went on to real estate and then banking and was extremely successful.  He was a member of the Bridgeport Board of Trade and aided in the establishment of various manufacturing enterprises.  I believe The Bridgeport Silver Co. was one of those enterprises and he was President in name only. 

Samuel Larkin (1823-1889) worked at the Wheeler & Wilson sewing machine factory and patented several designs concerning sewing machine attachments and improvements.  He was noted for being a machinist but also apparently had experience in silver plating.

Going back to Rogers & Brittin, the original four officers, as stated in the “1881 History of Fairfield County” were F. D. Rogers, President; F. W. Brittin, Vice President; S. T. Rogers, Secretary and E L. Brittin, Treasurer.

1881 History of Fairfield County pg770

1881 History of Fairfield County pg 770

F.D. Rogers is actually T.D. Rogers or Theodore Dwight Rogers (1822-1905).  The Rogers & Brittin postcard toward the beginning of this post lists his initials correctly. He was a lawyer.

F. W. Brittin (1853-1916) is Frederick, Edwin’s brother.  Later in 1885-86 he was issued patents assigned to the Silver Plate Cutlery Co. of Birmingham, CT.  Then around 1890 he was associated with William Watrous as superintendent of Norwich Cutlery, receiving a patent for them as well.

16766 F.W.Brittin 1886

Patent 16766 F.W.Brittin 1886

This is an example of one of his patents:

16766a F.W.Brittin 1886

Patent 16766 F.W.Brittin 1886

Edwin L. Brittin (1848-1881) was Treasurer; I’ve done an extensive blog post on Edwin…see “Edwin Brittin’s Squirrel”.  He and George Gill patented at least six designs for Rogers & Brittin.

And finally, Samuel Towner Rogers (1820-1913) was Secretary. He was an educator.

I know this might have been hard to follow.  In summary, what I believe is that Bridgeport Silver Co. was the hollowware arm of Rogers & Brittin.  When Edwin Brittin died and Holmes & Edwards acquired the company, they acquired Bridgeport Silver Co.  They used Bridgeport Silver Co., Bridgeport Sil. Co. and B.S. Co. as backstamps for their flatware.  Hollowware with the Bridgeport Silver Co. mark was no longer made.  And apparently Holmes & Edwards liked that Maltese Cross, as they obtained their own trademark for it.

So what’s with Wm. A. Rogers? They used the Maltese Cross as well!

Wm. A. Rogers Backstamp

Wm. A. Rogers Maltese Cross / Keystone Backstamp

And that’s the mystery of the Maltese Cross.

Posted in aesthetic, Bridgeport Silver Co., Derby CT, Derby Silver Co, E L Brittin, Edwin Brittin, George Gill, holmes & edwards, Maltese cross, Reed & Barton, Rogers & Brittin | Tagged , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Ives Manufacturing Co.

A dear lady and friend of mine presented me recently with a dozen forks in a lovely design that I had not seen before.  They were backstamped with a mark I had never seen before: “Ives Mfg. Co.”

Ives Mfg. Co. Mark

Ives Mfg. Co. Mark

The pattern was floral and it looked to me like a trillium or a variation thereof.

Floral Design on Forks

Floral Design on Forks

The background to the floral design was stippled and fleur de lis appeared within the design toward the top and lower down the handle.  At the base of the handle was a three leaf pattern.

Design Lower Down the Handle

Design Lower Down the Handle

My friend knew that I enjoyed researching the less well known silver manufacturers and their patterns from the 19th century.  She believed these forks fit the bill and she almost delighted in providing me with yet another silver manufacturer to track down and identify.  I have to admit, I loved the challenge.

And so, my search began.  An Ives Manufacturing Co. did exist in Connecticut in the 1800s, but that company manufactured toys and toy parts; they were and are especially well known for their model trains.  Perhaps they diversified a bit and manufactured flatware as well?  No.  That train of thought (ha) brought me to a dead end.

Ives was a relatively common family name in Connecticut in the 19th century.  A few of these Ives related individuals were involved in the silver industry.  Almer Ives Hall being one of them.

Although I have found no specific information with regard to the silver manufacturer named Ives Manufacturing Co., I do have a theory. Upon leaving Hall, Elton & Co. (see my prior post on Hall, Elton & Co.), Almer Ives Hall formed a company along with several other individuals one of whom was E. H. Ives.  See the last paragraph from the 1892 History of New Haven County below:

1892 History of New Haven County, Connecticut, Vol. 1 pg357 ALBATA almer i hall

1892 History of New Haven County, Connecticut, Vol. 1 pg357

I suspect they were looking for a name for the new company and the Ives had it! This company was formed in the late 1850s and only lasted for a few years. Almer Ives Hall then went on to become one of the principal founding members of Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co. If I am correct, that would date these forks to pre Civil War. They have the look and feel of that period of time.

The pattern name of these forks (if there was a pattern name) is still unknown.  I have seen “Olive” pattern flatware with the Ives Mfg. Co. mark.  I have also seen the “Medallion” pattern with the Ives mark.  Actually, I have seen two variations of the “Medallion” pattern with the Ives mark.  See below.

Two Variations of Ives Medallion

Two Variations of Ives Medallion

Interestingly, Hall, Elton & Co. also manufactured the “Medallion” pattern as did Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co.  Perhaps Almer Ives Hall was extremely fond of this classic design and brought it with him from Hall, Elton & Co. to Ives Manufacturing Co. and then on to Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co.

If I find more info on Ives Mfg. Co., I will update this post!

Posted in Almer I. Hall, Almer Ives Hall, E. H. Ives, Elton & Co., Ives Manufacturing Co., Ives Mfg. Co., Medallion pattern, Simpson Hall Miller | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Hall, Elton & Co.

I knew that Hall, Elton & Co. was a silverplate manufacturer located in Wallingford, Connecticut in the mid 1800s.  I knew this because I had researched patents during this period of time and several handle design patents had been assigned to them.  But now I had a couple of Oval Thread spoons with the backstamp “Hall & Elton” and I wanted to make certain that this “Hall & Elton” was the same “Hall, Elton & Co.” located in Wallingford.

To my surprise, I found that there was a German silver and coin silver manufacturer “Hall & Elton” located in Geneva, New York.  Surely, there must be a connection.  What are the chances that there are two Mssrs. Hall and Elton involved in the same business during roughly the same period of time? 

Researching further, I found that there was absolutely no connection between the two companies.  Who would have thought?  The Geneva, New York manufacturer was formed by Abraham Bashara Hall and A. D. Elton in 1841 or thereabouts.  And they used that backstamp “Hall & Elton”.  The second paragraph below from the 1892 “History of New Haven County” mentions Jacob Hall and William Elton establishing Hall, Elton & Co. about 1836.

1892 History of New Haven County, Connecticut, Vol. 1 pg353-354

1892 History of New Haven County, Connecticut, Vol. 1 pg353-354

This is a photo of Hall, Elton & Co.’s “more commodious quarters on Cherry Street”:

1895 Souvenir History of Wallingford pg16

1895 Souvenir History of Wallingford pg16

Many people don’t credit Jacob Hall as one of the original founders of Hall, Elton & Co. in 1836.  Instead they name Almer Hall, which is not the case according to the article cited above.  It appears that there were many Halls located in Wallingford at this time….it was a very common name.  The following year, 1837, Almer joined the company.  I don’t know if he was related to Jacob. The article below from the 1870 “History of Wallingford, Connecticut” gives a little background on Almer and provides an interesting story of visiting New York and being given seven pounds of German silver.  Note that there is no mention of Jacob…it states that Almer formed a co-partnership with William Elton in 1837 and called the firm Hall, Elton & Co.

1870 History of Wallingford, Conn Vol. 1 pg604-605

1870 History of Wallingford, Conn Vol. 1 pg604-605

And this is an illustration of Almer from that same 1870 publication:

1870 History of Wallingford, Conn Vol. 1 pg69

1870 History of Wallingford, Conn Vol. 1 pg69

The 1892 article shown at the beginning of this post mentioned Robert Wallace joining Hall, Elton & Co. about the same time as Almer, in 1837.  The following account is from the 1879 “New England Manufacturers and Manufactories”.  You’ll note that toward the bottom of this article it mentions that Wallace began making spoons for Almer Hall in 1834, probably experimenting and perfecting the process.  He joined Hall, Elton & Co. about 1837 and stayed with them until 1854.

1879 New England Manufacturers and Manufactories, Vol.2 pg636-637 RobertWallace

1879 New England Manufacturers and Manufactories, Vol.2 pg636-637 RobertWallace

The more research I did on Hall, Elton & Co., the more confused I got.  Noel Turner’s book, “American Silver Flatware”, gives the dates for Hall, Elton & Co. as 1837-1852, and further states that it was succeeded by Meriden Britannia and later International Silver.  And yet others state that Hall, Elton & Co. was purchased by Maltby, Stevens, Curtiss and Watrous Mfg. Co. was their successor.  Watrous was one of the original companies that became International Silver.  If either of these two trains of thought was correct, if Hall, Elton & Co. was acquired by either Meriden Britannia or Maltby, Stevens, Curtiss, they would have ended up within International Silver.  But, according to my research, neither scenario is accurate, although Hall, Elton & Co. did finally become consolidated with International.  The following information helps supports my belief. Trying to present this in chronoligical order, I’ll touch on their relationship with Scovill Manufacturing first:

1a. Hall Elton Directories Advertisements 1849-1859

1a. Hall Elton Directories Advertisements 1849-1859

The earliest directory listing I could find for Hall, Elton & Co. was 1849 in the New England Mercantile Union Business Directory.  At this point there was no mention of Scoville.  In 1851, however, Scoville Manufacturing is listed as “agents for Hall, Elton & Co.’s celebrated German Silver and Plated Ware.”  The 1859 New York City Directory states that Hall, Elton & Co.’s office is with Scoville Manufacturing Co., 36 Park Row and 4 Beekman Street.

1b. Hall Elton Directories Advertisements 1860-1869

1b. Hall Elton Directories Advertisements 1860-1869

As the ads above show, Hall, Elton’s New York address continues to be 36 Park Row, the Scoville address, through 1869.

1c. Hall Elton Directories Advertisements 1870-74 Park Row

1c. Hall Elton Directories Advertisements 1870-74 Park Row

And although Scoville isn’t specifically mentioned in the directories and ads from the early 1870s, their New York address remained 36 Park Row during that period of time.  Of interest, shown above is an entry from the 1874 Trow City Directory which lists Charles Benedict as President of Hall, Elton & Co.  This brings us to Benedict & Burnham’s relationship with Hall, Elton & Co.

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Vol 2 pg307-308

1896 The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut, Vol 2 pg307-308

The first article at the very beginning of this post states that Hall, Elton & Co. became a corporate entity in 1850 (February 14, 1850 to be exact).  Benedict & Burnham became the majority stockholder in Hall, Elton & Co. probably around the same time that Charles Benedict became President of Hall, Elton in the mid 1870’s.  After the deaths of Mssrs. Benedict and Burnham, the above article states that Charles Dickinson became President of Benedict & Burnham as well as Hall, Elton & Co until 1888.  The 1876 New York City Directory shows a new address for Hall, Elton & Co. at 75 Chambers Street and the directories shown below indicate that they remained at this address through at least 1884.

1d. Hall Elton Directories Advertisements 1876-1884 Chambers St.

1d. Hall Elton Directories Advertisements 1876-1884 Chambers St.

From 1878 to 1882 Hall, Elton & Co. advertised four silver plated designs.  Of interest is the “Niagara” design which is shown as “Patented” in the ad above.  I have not been able to locate a patent for this design.  And this 1882 ad appears to signal the end of any further manufacturer of new silver plate patterns.  And this just so happens to coincide with Meriden Britannia’s lease of their building which is mentioned in the first article of this post which states “In 1882 the company leased its quarters, for ten years, to the Meriden Britannia Company, but mainains its organization.”  Meriden Britannia did not acquire Hall, Elton & Co., they simply leased its buildings.

1892 History of New Haven County, Connecticut, Vol. 1 pg357

1892 History of New Haven County, Connecticut, Vol. 1 pg357

The article above states that in 1883 Maltby & Stevens subleased the Hall, Elton & Co. buildings from Meriden Britannia.  Also note that the last paragraph of this article mentions that there was a “lower Hall, Elton & Co. factory” built about 1857 by a company, having among its members Almer I. Hall (Almer’s son), Jacob Hall and others, for the manufacture of cutlery.  This article also states that the “business did not prove very successful.”  This building was occupied in 1866 by the Albata Plate Company for a short time.

The Morning Record May 5 1896

The Morning Record May 5 1896

The May 5, 1896 issue of “The Morning Record” article above states that the Maltby, Stevens, Curtiss company, located here (Wallingford) about fourteen years ago, in the plant owned and now occupied by Hall, Elton & Co., had purchased the Oneida community company’s factory five years prior.  So Maltby, Stevens, Curtiss only relationship with Hall, Elton & Co. was that it occupied their buildings under a sub lease from Meriden Britannia.  That was it.  And Hall, Elton & Co. seemed to be back occupying their own buildings in 1896.

As shown below, Hall, Elton & Co.’s ads for the period 1888 to 1898 are for German silver only, not plated wares.  And what is interesting is that the top of the advertisements read “Hall & Elton’s German Silver” (got that…Hall & Elton) in bold print while “Hall, Elton & Co.” is shown in smaller print toward the bottom of the ad.  Most likely their German silver spoons were also marked “Hall & Elton”.

1e. Hall Elton Directories Advertisements 1888-1898 14th Street

1e. Hall Elton Directories Advertisements 1888-1898 14th Street

You’ll also notice that some of the directories above show their New York address as 46 East  14th Street.  Coincidentally, that was also the New York address of Meriden Britannia who was leasing their buildings back in Wallingford.

1900 The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review, Vol.39 Jan.1900 pg.30

1900 The Jewelers’ Circular and Horological Review, Vol.39 Jan.1900 pg.30

The Jewelers Circular January 1900 article above states that Benedict & Burnham’s controlling shares of Hall, Elton & Co. were sold to George C. Edwards, one of the officers of the International Silver Co. The article goes on to say that the purchase was a private purchase by Mr. Edwards (not on behalf of International Silver) and it was not known if it would be turned over to International Silver later on.

1f. Hall Elton Directories Advertisements 1900-1907

1f. Hall Elton Directories Advertisements 1900-1907

 In the 1901 Polk’s (Trow’s) New York Directory shown above it states that Hall, Elton & Co. was “(consolidated with International Silver Co.)”.  So, the end of this story is that Hall, Elton & Co. ended up being one of the International Silver Companies.  But that didn’t come about through Meriden Britannia or Maltby, Stevens.  It came about through a private purchase made by George C. Edwards from Benedict & Burnham not Meriden Britannia.  You’ll see in the 1907 List of Corporations that they were still in business at that time.

I started this research because I was interested in the “Hall & Elton” mark on the back of my spoons.  It appears that the majority (if not all) of Hall, Elton & Co.’s flatware is marked “Hall & Elton”; their hollowware appears to be marked “Hall, Elton & Co.”

 

 

Posted in Almer Hall, Benedict & Burnham, Curtiss, Elton & Co., Hall Elton, Hall Elton & Co., Jacob Hall, Maltby Stevens Curtiss, Meriden Britannia, R. Wallace, Wallingford CT, Watrous, William Elton | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Five Years: My Etsy Experience

Where does the time go?  It seems like only yesterday when my daughter asked me if I had heard of Etsy and I said I hadn’t.  Now it’s five years later and I’m celebrating my fifth anniversary as a seller on Etsy.  I’ve sold over 800 antique and vintage items during this time and am still enjoying the process.  Following are some of my highlights from this past year.

Monarch Pattern by Pretat

Monarch Pattern by Pretat

As I’ve mentioned in prior year’s anniversary posts, the items found by family members who were searching information on a deceased relative are special for me.  I’m always delighted when someone finds something in my shop that is somehow connected to their family. The Monarch pattern flatware shown above was designed by Frederick E. Pretat.  Mr. Pretat was a talented and prolific artist who created many patterns for Rogers & Hamilton and International Silver.  A family member of his found flatware in the Monarch pattern as well as the Corona and Raphael patterns in my shop.  And he was provided with copies of the patents as well.

J. B. Williams Shaving Soap Ads

J. B. Williams Shaving Soap Ads

The J. B. Williams Shaving Soap advertisements shown above were purchased by a woman for her husband.  In her review she said he loved them and “is framing them with some old razors and hanging them in his shaving bathroom”.  These old ads are getting a new life in a shaving bathroom!  Pretty neat.

Western Cartridge Ad Illustrated by Douglas Brown

Western Cartridge Ad Illustrated by Douglas Brown

The illustration for the Western Cartridge advertisement shown above was drawn by Douglas Brown.  His daughter found it in my shop and was very happy to add it to her collection of her father’s work. 

Aesthetic Julep Strainer and Nut Picks

Aesthetic Julep Strainer and Nut Picks

Julep strainers, cocktail strainers and bar spoons have kept me busy this past year (both buying and selling).  I’ve had the opportunity to communicate with professional bartenders from around the world and some home bartenders, too!  I’ve launched the idea of using antique nut picks as cocktail picks and the concept has been well received.  The aesthetic design on the julep strainer shown above works so well with the Mayflower design of the nut picks, I decided to group them together.  The southern lady who bought this set called the nut picks “beauties” and advised that she has made juleps using the strainer and it “works just fine”.  Hearing that an antique julep strainer is back making juleps brought a smile to my face.

Aesthetic Sterling Silver Plate Forks

Aesthetic Sterling Silver Plate Forks

There are some items in my shop that I love so much, I really don’t want to part with them.  The aesthetic pattern forks shown above fall into this category.  They are marked “Sterling Sil. Plt. Co.”  This company was unknown to me as was the design.  I speculated that this might be a Hiram Hayden design as the butterfly was very similar to that in Hayden’s “Japenese” pattern.  Upon researching further, the Brooklyn Museum’s website indicated that “Sterling Silver Plate Co.” was a backstamp of Holmes, Booth & Haydens.  After being listed for quite some time, a woman purchased these forks.  In her review she called them “rare beauties”.  We have since communicated several times.  These forks have found a good home…I’m happy. 

Persian Pattern Nut Picks

Persian Pattern Nut Picks

The two Rogers & Brother nut picks in the 1870 “Persian” pattern were also listed for a very long time and remained unsold.  Although both were manufactured by Rogers & Brother, one had a very unusual (and rare) arrangement of the backstamp.  I photographed one in a martini glass and used it as the lead photo in the listing, promoting the theme of repurposing nut picks as cocktail picks.  I loved the photo and I really didn’t care if the picks ever sold.  But recently a woman found them and bought them.  The picks were just waiting for the right buyer to come along, and she did.  I lovingly wrapped them up and sent them to their new home just a few days ago.

Cover of Living Artfully, Inspired by Tradition

Cover of Living Artfully, Inspired by Tradition Written by Shannon Carter

And talking about nut picks, I can’t emphasize enough how much I love these diminutive little antique works of art.  On average, a nut pick is less than 5 inches long.  And the beautiful design detail on many of them is amazing.  But how many people use nut picks these days to actually pick nuts?  They are unwanted or unused sitting in a drawer somewhere. I think of them as little antique treasures waiting to be rediscovered, loved and appreciated.

It was through nut picks that I met Shannon Carter.  I am delighted when someone repurposes nut picks as cocktail or canape picks.  But Shannon has not only reinvented uses for nut picks, she has reinvented uses for so many antiques, collections and family heirlooms that might otherwise be neglected or discarded. 

The photo above shows the cover of her book “Living Artfully, Inspired by Tradition”.  First let me say, the book is absolutely beautiful.  It is a feast for the eyes.  I know this is a well worn cliche, but it truly is.  The photography is amazing.  And the contents are inspirational.  It inspires you to look at your possessions, collections and heirlooms with new eyes and rediscover new uses for them.

Shannon’s book has sections on collections, including miniatures, tradition and family heirlooms, recipes and entertaining.  The photo below shows gazpacho (one of the many recipes in the book) with little vegetable skewers…using antique nut picks as the skewers!

This book can be purchased at www.orangefrazer.com.  Proceeds will benefit the Taft Museum of Art, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Page From Shannon Carter's Book

Page From Shannon Carter’s Book

And finally, I mentioned in last year’s Etsy anniversary post that I sold hawthorn wood from my yard for craft purposes at my Etsy shop (that’s diversification for you).  I also sell other woods including yew, maple and holly.  This past year a woman from Texas purchased a piece of holly wood and wrote “My daughter is excited that I will be able to craft a wand similar to Harry Potter’s out of the correct wood (holly).  She says it’s really cool.”  In her review she said her “daughter is thrilled”.  My holly made a young girl in Texas happy.  I think that’s really cool, too!

Posted in antique, antiques, barware, cocktail pick, Etsy Experience, Living Artfully, nut pick, Ohio, olive pick, repurpose, Shannon Carter, Taft Museum of Art | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Frank H. Vogt

Those of you who follow this blog know that I have a fondness for antique bar tools, especially julep strainers and cocktail strainers in general.  Although antique julep strainers are relatively hard to find, it’s the “other” cocktail strainers, the unusual ones, the sometimes downright weird ones, that I’m constantly searching for.  There are some strainers that are even hard to recognize as strainers. 

I had written two blogs, one entitled “Some Turn of the Century Cocktail Strainer Patents” and another “Charles J. Hauck & Son, Brooklyn, NY” that included images of the following beverage strainer:

F. H. Vogt 1904 Patent

F. H. Vogt 1904 Patent

Mr. Vogt’s patent specification follows:

Patent Specification

Patent Specification

Now if you were at a yard sale and saw this strainer, would you know it’s a strainer? I would think it was a whisk of some sort, used for cooking.  Or maybe a scrubber, or something else.  But certainly not a cocktail strainer.  And although this patent was assigned to Charles J. Hauck & Son, who had manufactured other variations of cocktail strainers with which I was familiar, it did not necessarily mean this design was actually manufactured.

So I kept looking for this unusual strainer and one day “It” found me. 

Strainer Designed by Frank H. Vogt

Strainer Designed by Frank H. Vogt

If you are interested, you can find this strainer here at my Etsy shop:  https://www.etsy.com/listing/253563577/frank-h-vogt-antique-cocktail-strainer

This strainer did not have the C. J. Hauck backstamp.  It only had the patent date stamped on the handle: 

Handle With Patent Date

Handle With Patent Date

Now, knowing that the strainer had been manufactured, I could search for information on its designer, Frank H. Vogt.  Following is what I have gathered on Mr. Vogt, in chronological order. 

F. H. Vogt Picture in 1894 Delegates Manual

F. H. Vogt Picture in 1894 Delegates Manual

The photo and short bio above was taken from the 1894 Delegates Manual…Frank was running for public office.

1894 Echos of the Beer Club from New York Times Nov. 25, 1894 pg21

1894 Echos of the Beer Club from New York Times Nov. 25, 1894 pg21

The New York Times article above names Frank as Secretary of the Beer Club!

1896 The Brooklyn Daily Eagle April 23 1896 pg7

1896 The Brooklyn Daily Eagle April 23 1896 pg7

In 1896 Frank married Minnie Graf.

The patent announcement for Frank’s strainer appeared in the 1904 Official Gazette of the U. S. Patent Office:

1904 Official gazette of the United States Patent Office

1904 Official gazette of the United States Patent Office

“The Spatula” periodical featured the strainer on its September  1904 “What’s New” page:

1904 The Spatula, Vol 10 Sept 1904 pg759

1904 The Spatula, Vol 10 Sept 1904 pg759

Frank died in December of 1922.  The following obituary is rather odd.  It lists Frank’s professional as salesman.  It doesn’t say that he had been a state representative or lawyer.  It doesn’t even give the name of his wife, only the names of his children.

1922 The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Dec 12 1922

1922 The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Dec 12 1922

Minnie died in 1944 and her obituary was much more impressive than Frank’s.  At least it mentioned that she had been married to a lawyer and gave his name!

1944 The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Nov. 30 1944 pg9

1944 The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Nov. 30 1944 pg9

For those of you readers who are looking for a little more information on Frank Herman Vogt, below are a few leads you might follow:

Directories Articles etc 1

Directories Articles etc 1

And this:

Directories Articles etc 2

Directories Articles etc 2

Frank H. Vogt was quite an interesting fellow.  He was involved in his father’s tobacco business, became a state representative and lawyer, owned a tile company and metal specialties company, he was an inventor and let’s not forget that he was Secretary of the Beer Club. 

 

Posted in bar strainer, bar tool, barware, Brooklyn NY, C. J. Hauck & Son, Charles J. Hauck, Chas. J. Hauck, F. H. Vogt, Frank Herman Vogt, Frank J. Vogt, Minnie Vogt | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Patent, Patent…Who Has The Patent?

I was doing some research on Hall, Elton & Co. and came upon an ad for a pattern name I did not know.  The ad referred to the spoon illustrated as “The Niagara”.  The design looked familiar.  Upon comparison, it appeared to be the same as photos I had seen of flatware called “Angelo aka Saratoga”.  Now it just so happens, that I had been searching for the “Angelo / Saratoga” patent for quite awhile without success.  In the ad below, it says “patented”.  Did Hall, Elton patent this design?  Could it possibly be by Frederick Waterhouse, who had designed other patterns for Hall, Elton?  Anyway, below is the ad:

1882 The Independent Vol.34 pg.xxi

1882 The Independent Vol.34 pg.xxi

In an attempt to further research this pattern, I checked my books and online resources and found that it was called by several names in addition to Angelo / Saratoga.  I now knew that Hall, Elton advertised this pattern as Niagara.  I seemed to remember seeing a Youths Companion with a premium listing that mentioned the Angelo pattern.

1885 Youths Companion  Vol.72 pg.450

1885 Youths Companion Vol.72 pg.450

So Holmes and Edwards called this Angelo.  But in looking closely at the details of this pattern in comparison with that of Niagara, I noted several differences.  It seemed that I had an image somewhere of Saratoga and I wanted to compare that with the other two.  Below is that image:

1887 Facts Vol.6 June pg.10

1887 Facts Vol.6 June pg.10

This is from a periodical called “Facts” from 1887 showing one page of Wm. Rogers Mfg. premium offerings.  Saratoga is the same as Niagara but differs from Angelo.  Next are details from the three ads above:

1882 1885 1887

So far we see that there is a pattern called Angelo that differs from a pattern called Saratoga. The Angelo pattern has a number of different design details that vary depending on the manufacturer and or the utensil. This happens often in other patterns.

Saratoga Angelo Warwick

Saratoga Angelo Warwick

The last pattern above is often confused with the other two and may, in fact, be the pattern that was patented.  Warwick was manufactured by both Luther Boardman and Aurora.  Maybe Luther Boardman has the patent that covers all of these designs.  These three patterns are very similar but they are different.  And if you want to talk about different, let’s talk about Tufts interpretation of the design:

1897 Tufts Catalog pg.47

1897 Tufts Catalog pg.47

The image above is a photo from Tufts 1897 catalog.  They call this pattern Angelo. Looks like it’s backwards to me.

So we’ve learned that there is no Angelo aka Saratoga.  But there is a Niagara aka Saratoga. Angelo and Saratoga are quite different and should be respected for their differences. 

Does anyone know if there is a patent for one of these designs?

 

Posted in Angelo / Saratoga, Angelo aka Saratoga, Angelo pattern, Angelo/Saratoga, Aurora, Hall Elton, holmes & edwards, L. Boardman, luther boardman, Niagara pattern, Saratoga patterns, Tufts, Warwick pattern, Wm. Rogers Mfg. | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Rockford Silver Plate Company

This silver plated julep strainer has a backstamp of “R.S.P. Co.”  This mark, which I don’t see that often, is a mark used by Rockford Silver Company for their “service ware” line, meaning restaurants, hotels, soda fountains and such.

Rockford Julep Strainer

Rockford Julep Strainer

 

I had seen this scrolled star pattern with various International Silver company backstamps (e.g. Wm. Rogers) but never before with a Rockford Silver Plate mark.  There is also a similar star pattern (with little stars around the star cut-out) strainer that was manufactured by L. Boardman & Son.  I’ve seen this Boardman design with a Budde & Westermann backstamp as well (possibly this strainer was made by Boardman for Budde & Westermann).

Boardman Strainer Design on Right

Boardman Strainer Design on Right

 This julep strainer can be viewed here at my Etsy shop:

https://www.etsy.com/listing/251443103/silver-plated-rockford-silver-plate

I had researched Rockford Silver Plate Company a while back with the intention of sharing that information on my blog…but other things got in the way and then it completely slipped my mind.  Until now.  Following is a nice little condensed version of the history of the Rockford Silver Plate Company which states that it was founded in 1875 under the title of the Racine Silver Plate Company.  After a “disastrous” fire in 1882, the business was moved to Rockford, Illinois under the name Rockford Silver Plate Company.

1916-historical-encyclopedia-of-illinois-vol-2-pg875

1916 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois Vol.2 pg875

The following 1879 article provides additional information concerning Racine Silver Plate Company, including officers.

The History of Racine and Kenosha Counties 1879

The History of Racine and Kenosha Counties 1879

The patent shown below was obtained by Frederick Waterhouse in March of 1882 (before the fire) and assigned to the Racine Silver Plate Company.  I have seen flatware in this pattern with the Rockford Silver Plate backstamp, known as “Rockford Seven”.  However, I have never seen this pattern with a Racine backstamp and don’t know if any flatware in this design was actually manufactured before the fire (or if made, destroyed in the fire).

Design Patent No.12840 Racine Waterhouse 1882

Design Patent No.12840 Racine Waterhouse 1882

Following is an illustration of the Rockford Silver Plate Co. factory circa 1890 (found at the Rockford Public Library site).

Rockford Silver Plate Company ca1890

Rockford Silver Plate Company ca1890

Below are three items related to George B. Kelley. First is from a 1891 “The Jewelers’ Circular and Horological Review”, Vol 23 Oct. 7 1891 pg40. To the right is an 1884 design patent from Mr. Kelley, and last is his 1899 resignation announcement.

George B. Kelley

George B. Kelley

Next is an interesting design patented by George B. Kelley and assigned to the Jewelers Crown Guild.  We know that Mr. Kelley was an officer of the Rockford Silver Plate Company but what is the Jewelers Crown Guild? 

Design Patent No.22228 Jewelers Crown Guild George B. Kelley 1893

Design Patent No.22228 Jewelers Crown Guild George B. Kelley 1893

In his patent specification, Mr. Kelley states that the design is composed of a crown and scrolls.  Below the patent specification is a corporation listing showing the line item for the Jewelers Crown Guild.  So it was an actual licensed corporation in the State of Illinois.

Design Patent No.22228 Kelley 1893 Jewelers Guild

Design Patent No.22228 Kelley 1893  Jewelers Guild

Jewelers Crown Guild is on both the 1902 & 1904 editions of the listing. Note that the President is Joseph C. Peers, a prominent Rockford jeweler, and Clara McFarland who is also a witness to the Crown Guild spoon patent above.  This document also shows the Guild address as 202 S. Wyman Street, Rockford.  This just happens to be the same address as Rockford Silver Plate Co. which was 202-206 S. Wyman St. 

Jewelers Crown Guild Mark

Jewelers Crown Guild Mark

I have seen the above mark on pieces of Rockford Seven pattern flatware.  Rockford Silver Plate sold their wares solely to jewelers.  What exactly the relationship was between the Guild and Rockford, I can’t speculate.  I do know that they were located at the same address and George Kelley, an officer of Rockford, patented a design assigned to the Guild.

Below is an excerpt from the biography of Michael Freeman included in the 1892 publication “Portrait and Biographical Album of Racine and Kenosha Counties, Wisconsin” pages 723 and 724.  The important part of this and the next article is Lemuel Porter and his connection to not only Aurora Silver Plate but to Reed & Barton as well.

Portrait and Biographical Album of Racine and Kenosha Counties 1892 pg724

Portrait and Biographical Album of Racine and Kenosha Counties 1892 pg724

 

The Past and Present of Kane County, Illinois 1878 pg783

The Past and Present of Kane County, Illinois 1878

The next article concerns Edward Taylor who started out at Pairpoint Manufacturing.

Past and Present of the City of Rockford and Winnebago 1905 County, Illinois

Past and Present of the City of Rockford and Winnebago County, Illinois 1905

Following are two patents designed by Frederick T. Love in 1898 and assigned to Rockford Silver Plate Co.

Design Patents 28680-28681 FredT.Love 1898

Design Patents 28680-28681 Fred T. Love 1898

The next is a detail showing the expanded Rockford building at 202-206 S. Wyman St.  This illustration was included in the 1911 issue of “The Printing Art”.

Rockford Silver Plate ca1910

Rockford Silver Plate ca1910

The next three illustrations also came from the same 1911 issue of “The Printing Art”, Volume 16: 1911 The Printing Art, Vol.16 pg357

This is a representative page of the 1910 Rockford Silver Plate Co. catalogue: 1911 The Printing Art, Vol.16 pg359

As well as this: 1911 The Printing Art, Vol.16 pg360

The 1908 ad shown below mentions Rockford is “selling only to retail jewelers direct”.

The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review, Vol.56 May 1908 pg37

The Jewelers’ Circular and Horological Review, Vol.56 May 1908 pg37

And the following 1910 advertisement features the “R.S.P. Co.” mark in relation to “silver plated service ware”.

The Pharmaceutical Era Vol. 43 1910

The Pharmaceutical Era Vol. 43 1910

“Fairoaks” is a 1909 design manufactured by Rockford.  The following bent baby spoon (meaning the spoon is bent, not the baby) is available at my Etsy shop. 

Bent Handle Baby Spoon Fairoaks Pattern

Bent Handle Baby Spoon Fairoaks Pattern

You can find it here:

https://www.etsy.com/listing/182641041/rockford-silver-plate-bent-handle-baby

 

Posted in antique barware, bar strainer, bar tool, barware, cocktail strainer, International Silver Co., Jewelers Crown Guild, Jewelers Crown Guild, julep strainer, L. Boardman, luther boardman, P. Co., Racine Silver Plate Co., Rockford Silver Plate Co., star julep strainer, United States Jewelers Guild | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment