Some Doulton All-Over Transfer Printed Sheet Patterns

I found it very interesting that on four of my Doulton bowls there were seven different all-over transfer printed sheet patterns.  You can see three of these patterns here on the inside of the bowls:

Three Different Patterns on Inside of Bowls

Three Different Patterns on Inside of Bowls

And there were four completely different patterns on the back of the bowls.  Four bowls…seven patterns.  Note that all of these bowls have the “Doulton Burslem” mark.  How beautifully these patterns work individually on each bowl, as well as all together as a grouping.  Light blue, dark blue, gray, brown…

And Four Completely Different Patterns on Back of Bowls

And Four Completely Different Patterns on Back of Bowls

In researching these “all-over” Doulton sheet patterns, I found a couple examples of one of the patterns with a British Design Registration Mark.  The registration mark was assigned to Pinder, Bourne & Co. on May 13, 1879.  There were actually four patents registered, numbers 335148-335151. I’ve seen this registration mark only on pieces with the pattern shown below and I don’t know what the other three patterns were.  Pinder, Bourne & Co. was purchased by Doultons in 1878 but the Pinder, Bourne name was retained until early in 1882 when it became “Doulton & Co. Ltd.”. 

Pinder Bourne Pattern and Design Registration Mark

Pinder Bourne Pattern and Design Registration Mark

Another Doulton all-over transfer print pattern features a vine with moths and various insects.

Insect Pattern

Insect Pattern

The sink shown below is in what I call the “insect pattern” in red:

Insect Pattern Used on Sink

Insect Pattern Used on Sink

These patterns were used on important pieces of high-end pottery.  The contrasting blues look wonderful on this Royle’s self pouring teapot manufactured by Doulton.

Royles Self Pouring Teapot

Royles Self Pouring Teapot

Large vases and umbrella stands were also covered with these patterns.

Large Examples of Doulton All-Over Transfer Print

Large Examples of Doulton All-Over Transfer Print

And relatively small sized bowls were covered with these Doulton sheet prints.  The larger of the two bowls below is just over 7 inches wide.  The print on these bowls match, with brown on the interior and blue, in a different pattern, on the reverse.

Two Different Sizes of Doulton Bowls in Brown and Blue

Two Different Sizes of Doulton Bowls in Brown and Blue

The contrasting blue patterns below are on a bowl that measures just over 5 inches.

Contrasting Blue Patterns

Contrasting Blue Patterns

The Doulton Burslem bowls shown above are for sale at my Etsy shop and can be found here: 

https://www.etsy.com/listing/192212445/two-early-burslem-doulton-floral-sheet

https://www.etsy.com/listing/192195346/early-burslem-doulton-floral-sheet-print

 

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This entry was posted in all-over transfer print, chintz, Doulton Burslem, England, Pinder Bourne, sheet pattern, Staffordshire pottery, transferware and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Some Doulton All-Over Transfer Printed Sheet Patterns

  1. Beth Moran says:

    You are so good at researching things that I would like to ask for any suggestions you may have for me. I am trying to date an ArtCarved narrow gold wedding band we found among my aunt’s personal things. I have not been able to find a website to help me with this. I have spotted a few similar designs on ebay but they weren’t really dated either. The ArtCarved website was no help. Any thoughts would be welcomed. Loved the Doulton china post! Beth Moran Surprise, AZ Date: Sun, 8 Jun 2014 13:04:39 +0000 To: bammoran@msn.com

    • queenofsienna says:

      Beth, hi. From a quick search I see that Artcarved is the oldest and largest ring manufacturer in the United States and goes back to 1850. This brand was created by J. R. Wood & Sons. I don’t know when exactly that “artcarved” name first came into use. I do see that in the 1940s the ads showed it hyphenated “Art-Carved” and the 1950s ads show it as one word with no hyphen. In 1954 it was trademarked as one word with an underline.

      I would suggest you go into Google Books and search “artcarved ring”. You’ll find lots of Life magazines from the 1940s and 1950s and there are ads with illustrations of various rings being offered. Perhaps you can spot a similar ring in those ads which will give you some sort of time frame for when your aunt’s ring was manufactured. Hope this helps.

  2. KerryCan says:

    It’s funny–if I’d seen one of these Doulton pieces sitting around, I probably wouldn’t look twice, thinking it to be too fussy. But just reading your brief post gets me to see the beauty and the detail. That sink is spectacular!

  3. queenofsienna says:

    Reblogged this on Transferware.

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