The Early Spoon Design Patents – It Would Be An Interesting Collection

My last blog post looked quickly at electro plating in America during the late 1830’s.  While searching the patent office I noticed that out of the first 150 there are 7 spoon design patents. I thought these might be interesting to collect, so I did a little research.

I understand the patent office lost the earlier records in 1835 due to a fire. The first design  patent registered, is from Nov. 9 1842 for “Printing Type”. The first design patent for spoons etc. is No. 26 issued on Dec. 4th 1844 to Michael Gibney. The next six flatware related patents are shown here as well, in thinking they would begin to create a museum worthy collection. Patent number 150 and the year 1847 (remember “1847”) seem to be appropriate cut off points for some reason or another. Below are the first seven, grouped by designers: Michael Gibney, John C. Moore and William Gale & Nathaniel Hayden. I’ve included a very brief note on each.

Michael Gibney Design Patents

Michael Gibney Design Patents

Michael Gibney was active in New York City 1836-1860.  From what I understand, in 1869-70, Whiting acquired the flatware dies of Michael Gibney and Henry Hebbard.  Michael Gibney obtained the first flatware design patent in December 1844, for a pattern sold through Ball, Tompkins and Black and its successor, Ball, Black and Company.  His Tuscan pattern, patented in 1846, was developed at the request of shipping magnate Edward K. Collins for the dining room of a new transatlantic steamer.  (From the book:  Art and the Empire City: New York, 1825-1861  edited by Catherine Hoover Voorsanger, John K. Howat)

John C. Moore Design Patents

John C. Moore Design Patents

John C. Moore, born about 1803, died September 28, 1874.  I read that he began producing silverware in 1821.  “In 1851 the company (Tiffany) signed an agreement with leading New York silversmith John C. Moore to make hollowware pieces. Moore was instructed to follow the standard for English sterling-925 parts per 1,000 parts silver-which was the standard eventually adopted by the United States. Tiffany later merged operations with Moore, who soon enlisted the help of his son, Edward. The younger Moore would become the guiding force behind Tiffany’s silverware business for the next forty years.”  (From:  http://press.tiffany.com/ViewBackgrounder.aspx?backgrounderId=5 )

Gale & Hayden Design Patents

Gale & Hayden Design Patents

William Gale, New York, NY was born 1799 and died 1867; active c. 1822-1862, usually in a partnership.  “William Gale Sr. , was one of the most innovative silversmiths working in America during the first half of the nineteenth century.  On December 7, 1826 he patented a process by which a silver blank could be run through a roller die and emerge as a piece of flatware complete with decoration on both sides.  (From:  http://www.zoominfo.com/p/William-Gale/89972968

Nathaniel Hayden, born November 28, 1805 in Hayden (Windsor), Connecticut and died there on February 23, 1875.  He was a partner from 1846 to 1850 with William Gale in New York City as Gale & Hayden at 116 Fulton Street.

Following are the seven individual design patents in chronological order:

The First Design Patent, Gibney's No. 26

The First Design Patent, Gibney’s No. 26

I think this is an original, the rest are black & white copies.

Gibney Design Patent No. 59

Gibney Design Patent No. 59

This must be the Tuscan pattern mentioned above.

Moore Design Patent No. 114

Moore Design Patent No. 114

Moore Design Patent No. 124

Moore Design Patent No. 124

Gibney Design Patent No. 128

Gibney Design Patent No. 128

Gale & Hayden Design Patent No. 149

Gale & Hayden Design Patent No. 149

Gale & Hayden Design Patent No. 150

Gale & Hayden Design Patent No. 150

This would be a tough grouping to find…especially without monograms.

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This entry was posted in Black & Company, early spoon patents, John C. Moore, Michael Gibney, Nathaniel Hayden, silver plate, silver plate manufacturer, silver plated, silverplate, Tompkins & Black, William Gale and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to The Early Spoon Design Patents – It Would Be An Interesting Collection

  1. KerryCan says:

    I love these drawings and seeing the thought that went into the designs of something so utilitarian!

  2. Pingback: Edward Knight Collins | queenofsienna

  3. Kathy Gori says:

    lovely, I find that I have a set of Michael Gibney designed coin silver forks, the same as the spoon pattern #128. They’re marked Ball, Tompkins, and Black but I’d never known who’d designed them before. Great site.

  4. Stan Hayes says:

    As you note, #59 is now called TUSCAN. #114 is called LOUIS XIV and is offen mistakenly attributed to John Polhamus. #’s 149 and 150 are two versions of GOTHIC. To my knowledge, the others do not have names published in the literature.
    Early flatware design patents never include pattern names, more’s the pity. For my own catalogue, I call #26 “LOUIS XIV” because Gibney mentions that style in his patent. #128 I call “THREADED GOTHIC”; #124 I call “PRINCE ALFRED” because it looks similar to the known pattern PRINCE ALBERT.
    In case you want to see actual examples, I have all but the 1st version of Gale’s GOTHIC. I’ve never seen an example, and it may be that the pattern was never produced.

    • queenofsienna says:

      Thank you for your information and would be happy to include photos of your collection in my blog, should you wish to share them. Again, thanks!

  5. Paul Evans says:

    Can you prove side any information regarding
    Silver plated dinner fork with “California” and patent date Jan 15 or l6, 1867 or 61? Thank you.

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